Blog

2017
  • The Income-Tax department has issued notices to tax assessees who have shown unusually high income from agricultural activities.
  • Notices have been sent to around 700 individuals who have shown more than Rs 20 lakh as farm income. In all these cases, the farm income turns out to be higher than their main source of income, and the department suspects the veracity of the claim.
  • In Mumbai alone, the I-T has sent notices to around 100 people. In quite a few cases, the so-called farm income is twice the income from the main source of income they have been reporting in the past.

Archive


2017
  • As a non-resident Indian have you been grappling with the constant challenge of how various incomes would be taxed in your home country and in India? Are your decisions related to remittances, investments, property purchases and rentals marred at the thought of taxes?
  • Though tax laws in different countries are difficult to fathom, they aren’t as perplexing as you thought. Take for instance the income from abroad. The ground rule is that income which is earned outside India by an NRI is not taxed in India.
  • Similarly, there are a host of other incomes that aren’t taxed in India, but may or may not be touched in the country you are residing in. We present a simple guide for Non-resident Indian to assist them in saving taxes by understanding which income will be exempt and which won’t.

2017
  • A taxpayer has to comply with ‘paying’ income tax and ‘filing’ income tax returns every year. Though it is important to file the tax returns within the due date, this doesn’t mean that he cannot file his income tax returns, in case he has missed filing it, due to some unforeseen reason.
  • But if a person has missed the deadline, he might have to face some penal consequences and might even get a notice from the IT department anytime. In addition to it, there are other consequences of filing belated taxes which may affect the total tax liability of the taxpayer. The Income Tax Act has prescribed certain penalties for late filing of tax returns.

2017
  • The last day to file your taxes is July 31 (extended to August 5, 2017, for Assessment Year 2017-18). We hope that most of you have filed your taxes by now. A wise man once said that in this world, only two things are certain - Death & Taxes. Both of these entities have a due date. We can’t know and plan for the deadline for the first one, but have you ever wondered what will happen if you miss the deadline for the second.
  • If you haven’t filed your Income Tax Return for any reason, then don’t take the situation lightly. Failing to file tax return on time can be pernicious. There is a lot to lose if you don’t hurry. Some people have a common misconception that there is nothing to lose if they have paid their taxes on time. Today, we will look at everything which you can possibly, if you squander the chance to file your Income Tax Return on time.

Lose the chance to revise return

  • If you made any error in doing your taxes, tax department allows you to file a revised return. However, you cannot file a revised tax return if you filed your original return late. You should file your return before the due date so that you do not lose any refund due to incorrect filing.

2017
  • Taxpayers often ignore different types of income while filing their income tax returns. These incomes fall under ‘income from other sources’ category. This may happen due to the taxpayer’s unawareness about the taxability of such income or they hiding it intentionally from the tax authorities.
  • There are several heads of income like income from salary, income from capital gains, income from profession and business and income from house property for which you need to file ITR. There are, however, certain types of income that fall under the head ‘income from other sources’.
  • Income that comes under the income from other sources head must satisfy certain conditions. Firstly, income shouldn’t be exempt under the provisions of the I-T Act, and secondly, income should not fall under any other income head.

2017
  • The government has introduced new section 269ST in Income Tax Act 1961 for prohibition of acceptance of cash of Rs 2 lakh and more.
  • For cash transactions above that limit, the receiver will need to pay a penalty equivalent to the amount of transaction. There are no exceptions to this.
  • You cannot gift cash to close relatives (children, parents and spouse) above Rs 2 lakh and even on the occasion of marriage; you cannot accept a higher amount of cash as a gift.
  • At present, there are few other areas which have either a cap on cash transaction or a complete ban. Here are those transactions and the penalty that may attract for flouting the rules...

Financial Management